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#26 KyloRen

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 10:36 AM

I love the exemption clauses. Moral or ethical belief.

"It's against my morals to protect my child from getting sick, it's against ethics to protect a child and other children from getting sick" 



#27 Peaches

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 08:03 AM

Anyone watched the doco called Jabbed? I think that was fairly informative.

 

There are some people who are susceptible to the side effects of vaccines and it will have the reverse effect on them. Rather than protecting them against the infection, it only ends up infecting them and it can be serious. One such example is a child who received the polio vaccine (as all kids do) only to be infected with polio soon thereafter.

 

Those are not very common occurrences and some specialists think they can come up with a test to determine whether someone should be vaccinated or not to prevent such cases in the future. In the meantime this will continue to happen...and I think that scares a lot of parents which is fair enough.

 

What's not fair is that you are placing other people at risk. Just because someone has been vaccinated doesn't meant they're 100% safe. If there's that one kid that isn't vaccinated, they could still infect people quite easily. Those groups of people who choose not to vaccinate their children are known to infect one another constantly within their small community and I find that to be quite reckless.

 

I know there's a lot of debate about the contents of the vaccine and some people are calling it population control. I cannot dispute this as I have no evidence either way, but it does sound rather far-fetched.

 

The only vaccine I do not agree with IF you are a healthy human being is the flu vaccine. There is no point, your body will fight off the flu so just bite the bullet and let your body create it's own antibodies.

 

As for cultures/beliefs/religions, I've never known anything harder to influence otherwise. All three are deeply rooted into people's lives and often cross paths which creates a gigantic gray area therefore everybody thinks they're right when they are all probably wrong.


Edited by MillionsOfPeaches, 26 January 2015 - 08:06 AM.


#28 Bee

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 03:18 AM

The only vaccine I do not agree with IF you are a healthy human being is the flu vaccine. There is no point, your body will fight off the flu so just bite the bullet and let your body create it's own antibodies.

 

I have to get the flu jab because of my job. The fact that I come into close contact with vulnerable people means I'm putting them at risk if I don't get it. Most of the general populace don't need it, but I'd advise getting it if you work with kids or elderly people.



#29 Mishelle

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 07:27 PM

I never got my chicken pox vaccination because my mom never got it and she was afraid that I would get the chicken pox and in turn give her the chicken pox and now I'm like 24 years old and terrified of getting the chicken pox. 

 

Thanks mom. 



#30 pancakeface

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 07:59 PM

ezpz.

 

You chose to live in a herd. You should subscribe to herd immunity and herd mentality.

Ergo if you want to live in society you should vaccinate your children.

 

If you don't want to.... go live elsewhere you filthy outlaw. 

 

((ps i'm drunk i'm sorry))

 

Basically yea. Social contract, you may not like it but if you don't hold up your end of the deal, everybody is a loser.



#31 Padme

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 09:08 PM

Basically yea. Social contract, you may not like it but if you don't hold up your end of the deal, everybody is a loser.

 

Exactamundo 

 

That is precisely what my inebriated mind was getting at



#32 Peaches

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 08:46 PM

I never got my chicken pox vaccination because my mom never got it and she was afraid that I would get the chicken pox and in turn give her the chicken pox and now I'm like 24 years old and terrified of getting the chicken pox. 

 

Thanks mom. 

 

I've never had the chicken pox and I'm 25 and I don't know if I've been vaccinated or not (mum has no clue either). I think there's a test you can complete to find out whether you're susceptible however I heard it's expensive.

 

I have to get the flu jab because of my job. The fact that I come into close contact with vulnerable people means I'm putting them at risk if I don't get it. Most of the general populace don't need it, but I'd advise getting it if you work with kids or elderly people.

 

That's true too. That and whopping cough, get yourself vaccinated for both if you're working with kids. My parents did just because they were around my kid all the time.



#33 Trichomes

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:16 PM

I never got my chicken pox vaccination because my mom never got it and she was afraid that I would get the chicken pox and in turn give her the chicken pox and now I'm like 24 years old and terrified of getting the chicken pox. 

 

Thanks mom. 

 

I've never had the chicken pox and I'm 25 and I don't know if I've been vaccinated or not (mum has no clue either). I think there's a test you can complete to find out whether you're susceptible however I heard it's expensive.

 

I've never had the chicken pox either, but I was definitely vaccinated. When my sister was born, I wasn't allowed to visit the hospital because chicken pox was going around, and I had never had it. I was only three at the time, and it was pretty traumatizing being separated from my mom for several days (she had a C-section). I think the vaccine was introduced to the US a year or two later, in 1995. I was told I'd probably never get the chicken pox, and if I did, it would be a minor case, but I'm still terrified of possibly getting shingles.



#34 Swar

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:21 PM

I got the chicken pox when I was 5 or 6... I still remember how it itched.



#35 Peaches

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:28 PM

I'm freaked out to get the chicken pox. Why couldn't I have picked it up when I was younger  :thumbdown:



#36 Bee

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 12:27 AM

I've never had chicken pox either, I have not had the vaccination yet and I looked after a child last week who was eventually diagnosed with shingles. If you never see me again, I've died from shingles.



#37 Padme

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 12:39 AM

I'm freaked out to get the chicken pox. Why couldn't I have picked it up when I was younger  :thumbdown:

 

 

I've never had chicken pox either, I have not had the vaccination yet and I looked after a child last week who was eventually diagnosed with shingles. If you never see me again, I've died from shingles.

 

 

Teen and Adult cases can be super scary :| 

 

My sister was older than all us younger kids that had chicken pox and she got it so much worse. She even got them in her throat :( 

If you can get vaccinated for it, I would.



#38 Bee

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 12:45 AM

Teen and Adult cases can be super scary :| 

 

My sister was older than all us younger kids that had chicken pox and she got it so much worse. She even got them in her throat :(

If you can get vaccinated for it, I would.

 

Ouch. That's awful. I will get the vaccine as soon as Occupational Health get their heads out of their arses and catch up with what other vaccines I've had or not had.



#39 Jess

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 03:58 AM

I don't really like vaccinations because the littlest monster gets a mild case of whatever the vaccine is. Like when she got the measles vax, she got a measles rash, fever, the works and was sick for over a week. Flu vax gives her the flu, etc. Doctors can tell me all they want that she must've caught the things she gets before she gets vaccinated, but my oldest was never vaccinated until she turned 5-6, and her and Tessa got all shot up together. Other people would've gotten the things she gets if it were catching it beforehand, I'm surrounded by unvaxxed adults, besides myself.



#40 Jess

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 09:48 PM

This thread is boring and I'm bored.

Yes. Don't infect other people who may not be old enough to get the vaccine, or people who have weak immune systems, because you were too stupid to get your kid vaccinated. You don't have the right to make other people sick.

If your kids are too young to get vaccinated or too sick to get vaccinated, then what are they doing in public areas or in public schools? The measles vaccine wasn't even licensed until 1963 and MMR not introduced until 71. In 1962, (the year before the vaccine was introduced) there were approximately ~430 deaths from measles in the US. There are about 2000 deaths from strep throat yearly. So where's the strep vaccine? Why aren't people freaking out about strep in public areas?
 

Bahaha - and I thought it was only MY sarcasm people didn't pick up.
 
Get yo vaccines. This all started because of a doctor who published a paper about this and the link to autism. It was later proven to be incorrect (and the article was rescinded), but the damage had already been done. Stupid.

That's actually not where it really started, just where widespread belief came from. While it's proven to be incorrect now, there's still plenty of other reasons antivaxxers have for not getting vaccinations.

On the topic of schools, the FDA recently did a study that suggests that while people with the pertussis vaccine are immune, they carry the bacteria with them up to 6 weeks and are contagious to people who aren't immunized or don't get their booster. Where is the outcry against this? It's not uncommon for people to take their kids out of school over lunch and send them back to school after getting shot up. Are there parents of kids with weakened immune systems fighting to know what everyone's vaccination schedule is? No.



#41 ortin

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 11:04 PM

This thread is boring and I'm bored.

 

That's actually not where it really started, just where widespread belief came from. While it's proven to be incorrect now, there's still plenty of other reasons antivaxxers have for not getting vaccinations.

On the topic of schools, the FDA recently did a study that suggests that while people with the pertussis vaccine are immune, they carry the bacteria with them up to 6 weeks and are contagious to people who aren't immunized or don't get their booster. Where is the outcry against this? It's not uncommon for people to take their kids out of school over lunch and send them back to school after getting shot up. Are there parents of kids with weakened immune systems fighting to know what everyone's vaccination schedule is? No.

 

Something interesting I read in the article is that the acelluar version of the vaccine (pertussis chopped up) is the one that can last for up to 6 weeks in airways, while the whole cell vaccine lasts for only 3 weeks. How does that work...



#42 Ali

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 02:33 AM

Doctors can tell me all they want that she must've caught the things she gets before she gets vaccinated

I managed to get mumps AND rubella despite having had the MMR. Rubella was within the year after the vaccination and I was so ill because the doctors were adamant it couldn't be that because I'd had the MMR. :( Initially reluctant to say I had mumps when I was 13 even though my glands were practically the size of snooker balls. Stupid vaccinations.

Saying that, I've travelled so much that I think I've had every injection going. Yellow Fever, that's the real bastard.

#43 Jess

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 09:19 AM

Something interesting I read in the article is that the acelluar version of the vaccine (pertussis chopped up) is the one that can last for up to 6 weeks in airways, while the whole cell vaccine lasts for only 3 weeks. How does that work...

I think we can all agree I'm not a scientist. The only thing I know is that the acellular ones are more expensive.



#44 DregsandDregs

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 02:47 PM

I never got my chicken pox vaccination because my mom never got it and she was afraid that I would get the chicken pox and in turn give her the chicken pox and now I'm like 24 years old and terrified of getting the chicken pox. 

 

Thanks mom. 

 

Get the Vax. You're right to be terrified, because chicken pox can kill in adults

 

I've never had the chicken pox either, but I was definitely vaccinated. When my sister was born, I wasn't allowed to visit the hospital because chicken pox was going around, and I had never had it. I was only three at the time, and it was pretty traumatizing being separated from my mom for several days (she had a C-section). I think the vaccine was introduced to the US a year or two later, in 1995. I was told I'd probably never get the chicken pox, and if I did, it would be a minor case, but I'm still terrified of possibly getting shingles.

 

Oh god man, shingles sucks.  I got it in college and I was the luckiest person ever--I got it near my eye.  It was basically swollen shut and I had a 24/7 light sensitive migraine.  I thought it was a spider bite at first.  I could have lost the eye if it was any lower.

 

FORTUNETLY NOW THERE IS A SHINGLES VACCINE!  GO FORTH!

 

Also, you can't get shingles if you never had the chicken pox.

 

I'm freaked out to get the chicken pox. Why couldn't I have picked it up when I was younger  :thumbdown:

 

If you had chicken pox when you were younger there's a chance you can get shingles when you're older.  The Vaccine is better.
 



#45 Kaddict

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 11:18 PM

For people wondering if you got the chicken pox shot, you can get a varicella titer. It is just a normal blood draw, may as well check you lipids, thyroid etc while you do it. I don't know how much it costs, but most insurances cover it fully. Sorry, boring post over.



#46 cara

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 11:58 PM

I don't understand you Americans sometimes. I don't follow this debate that much (as it's stupid in so many ways) so I'm unsure as to what people's actual reasons are for not wanting to get their kid vaccinated. Vaccinations have saved so many lives it's absolutely absurd. 

 

Also see: How do vaccines cause autism?



#47 Kaddict

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 09:05 AM

It is a vocal minority that feel vaccinations are bad since some dude a while back falsified a study showing kids get autism. Ever since then, people (again, vocal minority) find new reasons why vaccinations are bad, like saying there is mercury in vaccines (even though it is a harmless mercury conjugate and in such tiny quantities that even real mercury wouldn't harm you in that dose) etc.



#48 cara

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 09:28 AM

It is a vocal minority that feel vaccinations are bad since some dude a while back falsified a study showing kids get autism. Ever since then, people (again, vocal minority) find new reasons why vaccinations are bad, like saying there is mercury in vaccines (even though it is a harmless mercury conjugate and in such tiny quantities that even real mercury wouldn't harm you in that dose) etc.

 

So if the study and all the other bogus was debunked then what are people still debating about?



#49 Kaddict

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 03:08 PM

So if the study and all the other bogus was debunked then what are people still debating about?

Because people are stupid paranoid.



#50 ortin

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 03:10 PM

So if the study and all the other bogus was debunked then what are people still debating about?

Because conspiracy theories about "big pharma" stealing your money through vaccines are fun




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