Quantcast

Jump to content


Photo

Fatphobia/Thin Privilege


  • Please log in to reply
103 replies to this topic

#101 MozzarellaSticks

MozzarellaSticks
  • 272 posts


Users Awards

Posted 14 July 2016 - 11:52 AM

Anything which causes malasbortion, there are many. Some people just have high 'metabolic rates.' Other times some conditions cause people to lose weight instead of gain weight. Feel free to google them.

The fashion industry is literally built on thin people. Up until VERY recently all new fashion models were stick thin.

I'm not even gonna bother going further on this.

I'm genuinely curious. Name the actual conditions. There are tons, so it should be easy, right? The whole idea of making someone else research it themselves kind of makes it seem as if you never have researched it yourself. I can't find a common medical condition that would cause someone to be severely underweight with treatment. Size is very much still within the average person's control. A medical condition would relate more to able bodied privilege than thin privilege.

If we're talking about fashion shows, you have to realize that's art. The designer cares more about the look than the buyer. They're artists. Model shapes come and go in fads, just like any form of art. Most of what goes into runways during fashion week isn't meant to be worn by anyone, it's a statement piece. You really can't compare them to everyday dress. If you're talking about advertising, nobody looks like the models in advertising, not even thin people. I'm very against unrealistic expectations, but I don't equate it with thin privilege. It's an issue that affects everyone, and dividing it between fat and thin negates the bigger issue itself.

Maybe it makes more sense to you now. I don't believe thin privilege exists because the examples of it are usually examples of some other sociatal problem masqueraded. It's taking away from the actual issue because you just divide the people affected by the problem.

Disorders include hyperthyroidism, inflamed tonsils, appendix problems, dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, cancer, intestinal parasites, stress in certain individuals, viral infections, bacterial infections, intestinal disorders like Crohns which cause malabsorbtion of nutrients, celiac disease, gastroparesis, and the disorder that I have called Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome. Considering 90% of serotonin is utilized in the digestive tract to cause peristalsis, mood disorders can cause problems with digestion such as IBS which is why it has such a high comorbidity with depression and anxiety.

Thin runs in my family but didn't necessarily reach me. My father's side had all boys that were incredibly athletic and rail thin. My sister was the same way. When she was 16 she had tonsil problems on top of it until she got the removed and once was 5'10" and 118 pounds. She was always teased and accused of being anorexic despite what I knew where she ate like a ravenous dog whenever she came home from track or cross country. She was hypoglycemic and genuinely couldn't get enough calories in her sometimes to support her basal metabolic rate.

Hopefully those genuine medical conditions and my own anecdote help understand that yes, some people are genuinely that thin and really, really wish they weren't.

No common medical conditions would cause anything significant while under treatment or when in remission. You can still gain weight. It's harder, yes, but still very much a possibility. When medical conditions that can do so to someone are ignored, its more of an able bodied problem than a body size problem. These medical conditions are (thankfully) not common, but I do conceded they exist. I don't see them as privilege.

Your sister is anecdotal, but she clearly wasn't eating right. Hypoglycemia is a medical condition she should have been seeing a dietician for. People do have different basal metabolic rates, which just means every person has to adjust according to their own needs. It's something people should be aware of, and something they very much can work around.

Except that you said above that they aren't given anything. So, to you, privileged is about getting something.

And weight isn't always in someone's control. I know a few people on feeding tubes because they have gastroporesis like @Tetiel mentioned.

Not always, but it's not exactly common for weight not to be in someone's control. The average person does not have gastroporesis. It's a rare disease.

Not given in the sense that someone is handed over privilege. Given like the invsivle knapsack. People with privilege are given advantages by that privilege itself.

I'm kind of curious what your definition of privilege is now. I've seen so many different ones. It seems like everyone has their own idea of what privilege means.

Edited by MozzarellaSticks, 14 July 2016 - 11:55 AM.


#102 sprockets

sprockets
  • DonJonatino

  • 753 posts


Users Awards

Posted 14 July 2016 - 05:12 PM

With regards to people's weight whether under, average or over there is this theory that the body has a set point or preferred weight that it will try to stick to. There's actually a hour long segment from BBC that tried to study it.

 

 

It's been several years since I've watched it but what they did was they took several skinny people and had them to overeat for a month to see what would happen - they did gain weight but once they stopped consuming those extra calories went back to their previous weight rather easily. If you have time you should watch it

 

When you think about it, it does kind of make sense since we are homeostatic creatures. 

 

Has anyone stopped and tried to think about this from a natural selection standpoint?

 

Not to dehumanize us as a whole, but we have to be aware of nature when having discussions like this.

 

Sure you could argue that it might be natural selection but evolution usually takes several generations to occur, plus that would also assume that those people aren't surviving to an age to reproduce and have offspring. While a lot of obesity related diseases occur later in life. Not to mention probably up until modern agriculture it was probably beneficial to store excess calories as fat because it's possible that you didn't know when you'd get your next meal. 



#103 Jess

Jess
  • šŸ“Aioli-AmericanšŸ“



  • 9,218 posts


Users Awards

Posted 14 July 2016 - 06:00 PM

I'm genuinely curious. Name the actual conditions. There are tons, so it should be easy, right? The whole idea of making someone else research it themselves kind of makes it seem as if you never have researched it yourself. I can't find a common medical condition that would cause someone to be severely underweight with treatment. Size is very much still within the average person's control. A medical condition would relate more to able bodied privilege than thin privilege.

 Hyperthyroidism, anorexia, IBS, cancer. It's easy to think treatment works for everyone, but the reality is that it doesn't, especially in the US. You can be "in treatment" your entire life and still not actually do anything about your illness, or have side effects or chelation that makes weight loss worse.. And there's things like migraines, where an "acceptable" treament (topamax) has the side effect of extreme weight loss. I don't know if you've ever been on a medicine where literally everything tastes like licking paint on top of causing medical anorexia, but it does make gaining weight next to impossible.
 


I obviously didn't read the previous page. 



#104 Tetiel

Tetiel
  • 11,532 posts


Users Awards

Posted 14 July 2016 - 06:07 PM

Your sister is anecdotal, but she clearly wasn't eating right. Hypoglycemia is a medical condition she should have been seeing a dietician for. People do have different basal metabolic rates, which just means every person has to adjust according to their own needs. It's something people should be aware of, and something they very much can work around.
Not always, but it's not exactly common for weight not to be in someone's control. The average person does not have gastroporesis. It's a rare disease.

Yes, there are anecdotes, but I'm really not understanding why you're dismissing different metabolic rates. Also you -did- ask someone to list medical conditions and those were just a few. My sister ran cross country and track. While she COULD have eaten all day throughout her classes, I don't think it was exactly feasible for her. She was also dealing with severe tonsil issues at the time which could have easily contributed.

I've known many thin people in my life that eat a normal volume. I've seen the same of obese people. There is nothing wrong with that. But I also never said it was a privilege, either. Just stating that there are genuine medical conditions as to why someone may be lean or obese. My lab I'm working on my PhD is working on a transgenerational epigenetic link between DDT exposure in utero and increase in obesity. We've found consistent results in the F2 and F3 generations. My point is that someone's body is someone's body. You can't just look at someone and judge their health based on size because there are true genetic, transgenerational epigenetic, and other environmental factors involved that increase the susceptibility of disease.

So no, some people cannot help the way that their bodies are and getting back on topic, that very viewpoint that you have is kinda privileged in itself.

Reference:
http://bmcmedicine.b...741-7015-11-228




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users