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International Women's Day


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#1 Coops

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:42 AM

Happy International Women's Day! What do you love about yourself as a woman? Who is your favorite woman (can be alive or dead)? 



#2 Cass

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:50 AM

6cfe4c00ad49c6cf3e1f47567ac51a54.jpg

 

Dame Maggie Smith! Amongst other charities she raised a lot of money for Cats Protection which strikes a personal chord for obvious reasons lol. Although not my personal favourite woman I do seriously love Emma Watson as well, for all the amazing work she's doing.



#3 Keil

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 09:29 AM

What I know about IWD: My roommate didn't make breakfast because of principles so I got cereal on campus.



#4 Kitty

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 02:11 PM

favorites: 

the_ellen_degeneres_show_itv2.jpg

No homo if I was gay this be my wife qq

 

220px-Carrie_Fisher_2013-a.jpgRIP princess

 

rs_560x415-140108073647-1024.Mariska-Har

 

and of course Emma Watson 


Edited by Kitty, 08 March 2017 - 02:11 PM.


#5 Adam

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 02:24 PM

Mariska Hargitay is my favorite!

Emma-Watson-Transformation-2.jpg



#6 Ali

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 03:13 PM

Emma Watson is one of my least favourite women.

I have spent most of IWD having a fight about the gender pay gap with a woman in my office.

#7 ortin

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 03:25 PM

Gotta celebrate it like Deadpool  ;)



#8 Waser Lave

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 05:40 PM

Emma Watson is one of my least favourite women.

I have spent most of IWD having a fight about the gender pay gap with a woman in my office.

 

I can imagine how that discussion went. :rolleyes: Worst. Feminist. Ever.

 

I consider myself a feminist (in the sense that I think men and women are and should be completely equal) but I've got to admit the whole concept of an International Women's Day seems a little odd to me, doesn't really seem necessary in modern Britain.



#9 Emily

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 06:51 PM

Mariska Hargitay is great. She founded End the Backlog. Respect. 

 

Also, my mom is one of my favourite women. 



#10 Adam

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 06:55 PM

Mariska Hargitay is great. She founded End the Backlog. Respect. 

 

Also, my mom is one of my favourite women. 

Also she gets her drop dead good looks from her mother, Jayne Mansfield! If I remember correctly, Jayne was in a car crash and was decapitated X_X.  Oh shit! Apparently the decapitation thing is just a myth, and her head was actually crushed...wow!

 

 Reports that Mansfield was decapitated are untrue, although she suffered severe head trauma.[315] The urban legend was spawned by the appearance in police photographs of a crashed car with its top virtually sheared off, and what resembled a blonde-haired head tangled in the car's smashed windshield. However, this was a wig Mansfield was wearing and possibly parts of her actual hair and scalp.[316] The death certificate stated that the immediate cause of Mansfield's death was a "crushed skull with avulsion of cranium and brain".

 

https://en.wikipedia...Jayne_Mansfield



#11 Emily

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 07:04 PM

Also she gets her drop dead good looks from her mother, Jayne Mansfield! If I remember correctly, Jayne was in a car crash and was decapitated X_X.  Oh shit! Apparently the decapitation thing is just a myth, and her head was actually crushed...wow!

 

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia...Jayne_Mansfield

 

Well, that's a horrible way to go O_o



#12 Amarillo

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 07:23 PM

happy womens day gurls !!!!

 

My fav is June moon (Cara delevigne) :D 



#13 Kaddict

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:40 PM

Emma Watson is one of my least favourite women.

I have spent most of IWD having a fight about the gender pay gap with a woman in my office.

What side were you on, and why?

Also, I think emma is overhyped...



#14 Prisca

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:49 PM

Favorite woman? My mother and mother-in-law. They are both incredibly loving and hard working individuals. <3



#15 Rocket

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 06:34 AM

I'm honored to know most of the women on Codex and even more to call some of you friends <3 



#16 Jess

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 11:35 AM

My favorite woman is Victoria Woodhull. It always will be.


and Mayim Bialik



#17 Ali

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 03:35 PM

What side were you on, and why?

Also, I think emma is overhyped...

There's no side to be on, it just doesn't exist in the UK. We have the Equality Act, women aren't paid less for the simple merit of being women, it has to be shown that your work or experience is materially different from a man in the same role. I realise it's very different in the US and you do genuinely have a pay gap, but we don't.

What DOES exist here is an earnings gap. Women earn less over their lifetime careers and their average salary is lower over almost all sectors (with very few exceptions where women tend to have the majority of roles; I think nursing may be one but not positive). But that's not because they're paid less because of being women. It's because they make life choices which may be related to being women.

In terms of lifetime earnings, men are able to claim their state pension at 65, women at 60. This is changing in the coming years to equalise but for years, many women retired 5 years earlier than men. I was all for retiring early personally, but of course that means 5 fewer years of earning power. That's a hefty sum straight off.

Far more women are part time workers. Mostly because of motherhood. They go back to working 3 or 4 days a week instead of 5 once the children arrive, their salary takes the pro rata hit. Women are more likely to take maternity leave than men are to take paternity leave. Yes, there's the physical hit women are taking and want to recover from, but also there's still a stigma to men taking the time off. You have to remember that maternity is a FAR more attractive prospect here than it is the US, because there's statutory pay and a lot of good employers will top that up. I'd get the first 3 months on full pay, months 4-9 on 50% pay and the remaining 3 months on 25% pay. In that time, I'd still accrue my benefits including paid annual leave, again much much higher than the US, so any maternity leave I took would end with the 25 days of paid "holiday" I'd earnt during that leave. So almost 13 months out, with some money coming in all that time.

Because of that it's not uncommon in the slightest for a woman to take an entire year off for maternity. A whole year. And then they come back, work for a year and then get pregnant and have another one, the whole process repeats. If you take 1/2/3 years out the office, your career suffers. Men aren't doing that. They're in the office, gaining experience, furthering their prospects. And when their female counterparts come back, not only are the men now more experienced, but they're not leaving the office dead on 5pm for the sake of childcare, they're picking work up then too. So they get promoted, they get payrises and it's actually very reasonable.

There's also just a big split between the careers men and women pick. Look at low paying careers such as charity workers, nurses, carers, administrators, there's a heavy bias towards women. Bankers, city lawyers, engineers, C suite execs, other high flying corporate roles, far more men.

Arguably a lot of it comes down to traditional gender roles and issues when we're much younger, girls don't tend take STEM subjects at university for instance, and are more likely to pick softer subjects all the way through their academic careers, which limits what they can do afterwards. More needs to be done to promote paternity leave so women feel they can go back to work if that's what they want. Companies are wising up to flexible working so women can work from home to maintain their workload whilst at least being physically present at home.

Still, a lot of it comes down to choice, pure and simple. If you want to be a mother, and take a year's maternity leave, and leave on time every day, that affects your earnings compared to the man who doesn't. If you want to be a legal secretary rather than a lawyer, you will earn less than the man who becomes a senior partner.

And none of that's wrong. I'm not saying women shouldn't be mothers, or nurses, or whatever they want. Study fine art instead of physics. But there's a financial hit compared to men who don't make those decisions. If you don't want to be paid less, make better life decisions and consider the effect it will have on your career.

There's this weird idea that men "have it all", but they don't. They make choices and sacrifices the same as anyone else. My brother is a lawyer, he spent years missing out on bloody loads of time with his children. He earns about 10x as much as his wife, but he has also had a lot of days where the only thing he's seen of the kids is their sleeping heads.

I can imagine how that discussion went. :rolleyes: Worst. Feminist. Ever.

Oh to be barefoot in the kitchen for the rest of my days. Bloody menfolk making me "have a job" and "allowed to vote".

#18 Kaddict

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 12:38 PM

There's no side to be on, it just doesn't exist in the UK. We have the Equality Act, women aren't paid less for the simple merit of being women, it has to be shown that your work or experience is materially different from a man in the same role. I realise it's very different in the US and you do genuinely have a pay gap, but we don't.

What DOES exist here is an earnings gap. Women earn less over their lifetime careers and their average salary is lower over almost all sectors (with very few exceptions where women tend to have the majority of roles; I think nursing may be one but not positive). But that's not because they're paid less because of being women. It's because they make life choices which may be related to being women.

In terms of lifetime earnings, men are able to claim their state pension at 65, women at 60. This is changing in the coming years to equalise but for years, many women retired 5 years earlier than men. I was all for retiring early personally, but of course that means 5 fewer years of earning power. That's a hefty sum straight off.

Far more women are part time workers. Mostly because of motherhood. They go back to working 3 or 4 days a week instead of 5 once the children arrive, their salary takes the pro rata hit. Women are more likely to take maternity leave than men are to take paternity leave. Yes, there's the physical hit women are taking and want to recover from, but also there's still a stigma to men taking the time off. You have to remember that maternity is a FAR more attractive prospect here than it is the US, because there's statutory pay and a lot of good employers will top that up. I'd get the first 3 months on full pay, months 4-9 on 50% pay and the remaining 3 months on 25% pay. In that time, I'd still accrue my benefits including paid annual leave, again much much higher than the US, so any maternity leave I took would end with the 25 days of paid "holiday" I'd earnt during that leave. So almost 13 months out, with some money coming in all that time.

Because of that it's not uncommon in the slightest for a woman to take an entire year off for maternity. A whole year. And then they come back, work for a year and then get pregnant and have another one, the whole process repeats. If you take 1/2/3 years out the office, your career suffers. Men aren't doing that. They're in the office, gaining experience, furthering their prospects. And when their female counterparts come back, not only are the men now more experienced, but they're not leaving the office dead on 5pm for the sake of childcare, they're picking work up then too. So they get promoted, they get payrises and it's actually very reasonable.

There's also just a big split between the careers men and women pick. Look at low paying careers such as charity workers, nurses, carers, administrators, there's a heavy bias towards women. Bankers, city lawyers, engineers, C suite execs, other high flying corporate roles, far more men.

Arguably a lot of it comes down to traditional gender roles and issues when we're much younger, girls don't tend take STEM subjects at university for instance, and are more likely to pick softer subjects all the way through their academic careers, which limits what they can do afterwards. More needs to be done to promote paternity leave so women feel they can go back to work if that's what they want. Companies are wising up to flexible working so women can work from home to maintain their workload whilst at least being physically present at home.

Still, a lot of it comes down to choice, pure and simple. If you want to be a mother, and take a year's maternity leave, and leave on time every day, that affects your earnings compared to the man who doesn't. If you want to be a legal secretary rather than a lawyer, you will earn less than the man who becomes a senior partner.

And none of that's wrong. I'm not saying women shouldn't be mothers, or nurses, or whatever they want. Study fine art instead of physics. But there's a financial hit compared to men who don't make those decisions. If you don't want to be paid less, make better life decisions and consider the effect it will have on your career.

There's this weird idea that men "have it all", but they don't. They make choices and sacrifices the same as anyone else. My brother is a lawyer, he spent years missing out on bloody loads of time with his children. He earns about 10x as much as his wife, but he has also had a lot of days where the only thing he's seen of the kids is their sleeping heads.
Oh to be barefoot in the kitchen for the rest of my days. Bloody menfolk making me "have a job" and "allowed to vote".

Beautifully stated. Totally concur.



#19 neobella18

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 10:44 PM

i love how strong i am. which i realized this year. 

 

favorite woman would probably be my grandmother on my fathers side.




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