Quantcast

Jump to content


Photo

Owning pets, is it right or wrong?


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#26 Eagles

Eagles
  • 518 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 08:11 PM

Um, no. 


 

 

Anyways, I don't think there's anything inherently immoral with pet ownership. What's problematic is allowing your pet to reproduce without being able to properly take care of the offspring, mistreatment/abuse (including trying to own undomesticated animals that aren't suited to being pets), and the ownership of animals that are threatened/endangered or a threat to the public (without a legitimate reason).

Tell me a common household pet that is native to America. @Bone



#27 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴


  • 9,342 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 08:14 PM

Tell me a common household pet that is native to America. @Bone

Rabbits, birds, and fish. Looks like dogs were also owned by Native Americans, but they were different than the ones introduced by the Spanish.



#28 Eagles

Eagles
  • 518 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 09:16 PM

The majority of fish owned in america are goldfish, which are not native to north america. Also, take a look at the statistic on rabbits. Can you explain that to me? 6.2 million rabbits reside in 19 million homes. That statistic just makes no sense. Either the sample size was 19 million, and of those, 6.2 million have rabbits? Which is total bs, because you can't sit there and tell me that one in every three has a pet fuckin rabbit. no. Or it says that 6.2 million rabbits are in 19 million homes.. which in that case there is half a rabbit in some houses. It just makes no sense. Rabbits arent a common household pet. Also, let me know a popular pet bird that is native to north america. And regarding dogs, unless im wrong, the article says that the dogs native to north america were actually wolves and coyotes. Who has a pet coyote and wolf?



#29 Bone

Bone
  • no

  • 3,638 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 09:52 PM

Tell me a common household pet that is native to America. @Bone


You said "animal", not "common household pet".

#30 Kaddict

Kaddict
  • 1,723 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 10:41 PM

Owning pets is totally fine if you want to have something that pisses the bed every week because they have bladder issues. But owning a puppy and then dumping it in the middle of nowhere once it is not a puppy is not cool. Also, I would be thrown in jail if I had a pet I treated like my neopet. I would just be amazed that it survived without food for 12 years. Don't get me started on all the radiation from the lab ray I subjected it to...



#31 Emily

Emily
  • Wonder Woman



  • 6,466 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 10:55 PM

Yes, it's fine as long as you love and take care of them. 

 

I have neighbors that have four dogs and hardly take care of them. They let them piss and crap inside of the house, keep them in tiny cages, and I don't understand why they think this is okay. I don't understand why they have so many dogs if they can't even take care of them. One of the dogs belongs to my friend's girlfriend but the dog is always over at his place because she has a cat at her place. What? slkdrjsdjs 



#32 masxed

masxed
  • 695 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:26 PM

Owning pets is totally fine if you want to have something that pisses the bed every week because they have bladder issues. But owning a puppy and then dumping it in the middle of nowhere once it is not a puppy is not cool. Also, I would be thrown in jail if I had a pet I treated like my neopet. I would just be amazed that it survived without food for 12 years. Don't get me started on all the radiation from the lab ray I subjected it to...

 

 Lmao, how we treat our Neopets is a funny thought. I'm pretty sure I'd be in jail too for administrating my neopet steroids neggs/potions and using the battledome dog fighting. Not to mention the over the top customizations zoophilia.  :lol2:

 

Yes, it's fine as long as you love and take care of them. 

 

I have neighbors that have four dogs and hardly take care of them. They let them piss and crap inside of the house, keep them in tiny cages, and I don't understand why they think this is okay. I don't understand why they have so many dogs if they can't even take care of them. One of the dogs belongs to my friend's girlfriend but the dog is always over at his place because she has a cat at her place. What? slkdrjsdjs 

 

 It's a shame when people mistreat animals.  :ohwell:  My miniature dachshund used to have back issues and we were supposed to put him in a tiny cage. I just couldn't do that to the poor guy so I built him a play-pen bigger than the ones they make for babies lol. That's an odd thought to separate the dog and cat like that? I've never seen an issue with them in the same house, just the cats and dogs "playing". Aka little territory wars with lots of stare-downs. My dachshund has cuddled with our cat too, it's so adorable to see them sleeping next to each other like total pals! ^_^



#33 cara

cara
  • 56/m/mexico

  • 3,269 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:58 PM

Domestic, yes. Wild, no.

 

I wanted to get a little baby duck for the longest time, but I read when it becomes fully grown it's just unfair to keep them cooped up in a house or even a backyard when they should be roaming the lands and doing duck shit.

 

BUT, I knew a boy once who had a squirrel as a pet. Apparently the little guy had badly broken his leg (or something) and the animal control were going to put him down. Instead, he took him in. I'm not sure what kind of quality of life the squirrel had, but he said he was happy and roamed around their house and yard and what not.



#34 masxed

masxed
  • 695 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 November 2014 - 12:34 AM

Domestic, yes. Wild, no.

 

I wanted to get a little baby duck for the longest time, but I read when it becomes fully grown it's just unfair to keep them cooped up in a house or even a backyard when they should be roaming the lands and doing duck shit.

 

BUT, I knew a boy once who had a squirrel as a pet. Apparently the little guy had badly broken his leg (or something) and the animal control were going to put him down. Instead, he took him in. I'm not sure what kind of quality of life the squirrel had, but he said he was happy and roamed around their house and yard and what not.

 

 That story about the squirrel sounds cute! @cara What do you think about wild animals that are raised from birth to become adjusted to captivity? Just out of curiosity since my own turtle shows the actions and attitude of domesticated pets. My turtle would probably be considered wild, I adopted the bugger two days after he hatched. The previous "owner" was experimenting with egg incubation and said she found her specimens in nearby streams. I have future plans to construct him a private pond, which I suppose would change his status from "captive" to "free" since many of the turtles in the area live their lives in single ponds.



#35 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴


  • 9,342 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:04 AM

The majority of fish owned in america are goldfish, which are not native to north america. Also, take a look at the statistic on rabbits. Can you explain that to me? 6.2 million rabbits reside in 19 million homes. That statistic just makes no sense. Either the sample size was 19 million, and of those, 6.2 million have rabbits? Which is total bs, because you can't sit there and tell me that one in every three has a pet fuckin rabbit. no. Or it says that 6.2 million rabbits are in 19 million homes.. which in that case there is half a rabbit in some houses. It just makes no sense. Rabbits arent a common household pet. Also, let me know a popular pet bird that is native to north america. And regarding dogs, unless im wrong, the article says that the dogs native to north america were actually wolves and coyotes. Who has a pet coyote and wolf?

You weren't exactly coming up with a list of pets.

 

I think it's narrow-minded to assume people only own one rabbit, a lot of people who own animals own multiple of an animal, so the animals don't get lonely. Also, there's that saying 'multiply like rabbits'.

 

I can't find any real science data on what types of fish people own, but I suspect most of them own more than one fish too. To be fair, I'm also not looking that hard, because... they're fish.

 

You'll probably dismiss this as white trash, so I don't know why I'm bothering, but turkeys come instantly to mind, as do quail. Not everyone finds these animals as appealing as food as I do, and they're good for things like keeping bugs cleared down.

 

Every dog started off as something like a coyote or wolf, pugs didn't grow naturally in the wild, right along with sabre tooth tigers. Like, everything started as something you would find unappealing as a household pet, something you wouldn't want around your children... is that seriously not the point you were making? If it's not, than I'm totally confused about what you were getting at.



#36 Frizzle

Frizzle
  • M'lord

  • 16,889 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 November 2014 - 07:11 AM

Plus fish don't have the mentality to imagine inane subjects like captivity and boredom.

#37 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴


  • 9,342 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 November 2014 - 07:21 AM

Plus fish don't have the mentality to imagine inane subjects like captivity and boredom.

idk my mom's gets scared when I sneak up on it.

#38 cara

cara
  • 56/m/mexico

  • 3,269 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 November 2014 - 08:00 AM

 That story about the squirrel sounds cute! @cara What do you think about wild animals that are raised from birth to become adjusted to captivity? Just out of curiosity since my own turtle shows the actions and attitude of domesticated pets. My turtle would probably be considered wild, I adopted the bugger two days after he hatched. The previous "owner" was experimenting with egg incubation and said she found her specimens in nearby streams. I have future plans to construct him a private pond, which I suppose would change his status from "captive" to "free" since many of the turtles in the area live their lives in single ponds.

 

Oh, well I don't think I know enough about turtles to give you any kind of educated answer. :p I think it's mostly about the room limitations for pets in captivity that bothers me. I can't imagine a turtle does much running around? And can't you just take him to a park and let him wander and that is almost equivalent to if he was in nature? I feel like it would be more for the larger/more active animals (ie the tigers at zoos that are in tiny pens).



#39 masxed

masxed
  • 695 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 November 2014 - 04:34 PM

Oh, well I don't think I know enough about turtles to give you any kind of educated answer. :p I think it's mostly about the room limitations for pets in captivity that bothers me. I can't imagine a turtle does much running around? And can't you just take him to a park and let him wander and that is almost equivalent to if he was in nature? I feel like it would be more for the larger/more active animals (ie the tigers at zoos that are in tiny pens).

 

 Oh yeah I see where your coming from! I feel bad for tigers, etc too. Lol yes he doesn't run, he tries occasionally though and it is quite adorable.  ;) Snapping turtles are actually very active compared to what you'd expect, thankfully he has plenty of room to explore in the tank and gets to go on trips outside. Sometimes even the park like you mentioned! lol



#40 jinq

jinq
  • 1,548 posts


Users Awards

Posted 07 November 2014 - 03:59 PM

Owning is fine but disowning is a big problem. Some animals are just not meant to be kept as pets and some people just don't get that.



#41 SheOfTheEnderworld

SheOfTheEnderworld
  • The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist

  • 3,838 posts


Users Awards

Posted 08 November 2014 - 05:57 PM

Keeping domesticated pets, yes. Keeping naturally wild animals, no. Non domestic animals are not meant to be owned or caged, as their natural instincts are to attack and/or flee.

 

This is exactly how I feel about it as well.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users