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Do you tip?


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#1 Frizzle

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:13 PM

If yes, why are you a capitalist hell-dog perpetuating a classist system?

If no, why do you live in a socialist utopia surrounded by the reassurances of your superiority?

#2 Swar

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:16 PM

No, I don't. I think most people here don't.



#3 666

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:21 PM

i tip a minimum of 20% when i go out

even when im with friends ill call their asses out and make sure they do the same

 

i think most people that have waited tables before can understand how tips are most of your wages 



#4 talbs

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:23 PM

I tend to tip 20%-25% if the service exceeds expectations, 15% if the service is average, and normally around 10% if the service is poor. If it is downright terrible, I will leave without tipping at all, but that is an extremely rare occurrence.



#5 666

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:26 PM

I tend to tip 20%-25% if the service exceeds expectations, 15% if the service is average, and normally around 10% if the service is poor. If it is downright terrible, I will leave without tipping at all, but that is an extremely rare occurrence.

 

 

likewise.  ill tip 10-15 depending on how bad the service is or if theyre being a dick,but yeah even if theyre a douche i still leave a tip

 

an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind, so id rather not be a dick back to a dick because then hell just be complacent  with his dickness



#6 Keil

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:27 PM

If yes, why are you a capitalist hell-dog perpetuating a classist system?

If no, why do you live in a socialist utopia surrounded by the reassurances of your superiority?

 

 

I said yes because I live in a socialist utopia surrounded by the reassurances of my superiority.



#7 Rocket

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:28 PM

I tip minimum 20%. Most places you make less than minimum wage and tips make a huge difference. The better the service the higher the tip.



#8 Frizzle

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:29 PM

So where does the percentages come from? Why do you arbitrarily decide on that number?

Surely the cost of the meal doesn't correlate to the amount of effort they've put in?

Surely rewarding bad behaviour and bad service is contradictory?

#9 Lollita

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:31 PM

No, I don't. I think most people here don't.

 

Yep, most people here don't, it's not a habit. 



#10 Swar

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:37 PM

Oh, and here waiters receive more than the minimum wage. At least they're supposed to.



#11 Guppie

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:39 PM

I do when I'm in the US, and when I'm elsewhere, but the people around me are doing it.

 

So, pretty much the US and Romania thus far.



#12 666

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:40 PM

So where does the percentages come from? Why do you arbitrarily decide on that number?

Surely the cost of the meal doesn't correlate to the amount of effort they've put in?

Surely rewarding bad behaviour and bad service is contradictory?

 

idk if youre in america, but most waiters make $2.5-$3 an hour while minimum wage is $8-15 depending on state 

so the tips help make up for the lower wage 

 

tipping isnt about correlation, its about thanking them for handling my needs for 1-2 hours especially when one is picky



#13 GetJinxed

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:43 PM

I've tipped once  :) Other than that, nope  :unsure:



#14 Frizzle

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:47 PM

idk if youre in america, but most waiters make $2.5-$3 an hour while minimum wage is $8-15 depending on state
so the tips help make up for the lower wage

tipping isnt about correlation, its about thanking them for handling my needs for 1-2 hours especially when one is picky


So why not 20% or 12.5%? Why not 35%? I mean, 35% of a $10 meal is less than 20% of a $50 meal? I mean, if you're trying to help out someone who makes less money than you ( even though it's not your responsibility and its unlike you give that much to people who need it more), wouldn't you just pay them $5 per hour you're they're?

#15 talbs

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:50 PM

So where does the percentages come from? Why do you arbitrarily decide on that number?

Surely the cost of the meal doesn't correlate to the amount of effort they've put in?

Surely rewarding bad behaviour and bad service is contradictory?

 

The percentage of "15" seems to be the norm that is expected. Most places will print suggestions on the bill for you, normally 10, 15, and 20 percent, although sometimes I have seen 18. 

 

I agree with you as far as the cost correlated to the effort. The effort is likely the same no matter if my meal costs $20 or $200, but I guess if I am in the position to where I can afford a $200 meal, I can probably swing for the additional $40 tip. 

 

While rewarding bad service with a tip is contradictory, I also am aware that most of these waiters and waitresses in the establishments that I frequent probably aren't making but $2.13 an hour, so a tip goes a long way for them. Maybe they are having an off day, or maybe they were swamped and that's why my service suffered. Of course, maybe they are just slack and undeserving of said tip, but I tend to give them the benefit of the doubt. Besides, a lot of places have to split their tips, and it is unfair to punish the cook or bartender just because the waiter failed to deliver on their end.

 

I also tend to tip a little more if I am at a bar or restaurant watching a sporting event. I feel guilty for taking up space for so long knowing they could have served additional tables/earned additional tips in the time frame that I occupied the booth. The percentage of my tips also seem to increase with my levels of intoxication.



#16 Frizzle

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 12:55 PM

Why does someone deserve and extra $4 for doing the same amount of work other than bringing over a couple of drinks?

I had a barman basically ask me for a tip in Vegas, he literally just handed me a warm $8 beer...

Besides aren't companies legally required to pay the differences to make minimum wage?

#17 666

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:01 PM

So why not 20% or 12.5%? Why not 35%? I mean, 35% of a $10 meal is less than 20% of a $50 meal? I mean, if you're trying to help out someone who makes less money than you ( even though it's not your responsibility and its unlike you give that much to people who need it more), wouldn't you just pay them $5 per hour you're they're?

 

well it is like me to be generous, thats just the type of person ive always been so idk how its "unlike me"

 

but again it all depends on the quality of the service.  also one can typically assume that if you have more plates/dishes/drinks its more work for them and theyre also managing your table, seeing when your glsss is empty, trily thinking about your needs etc.  so i think that warrants more of a tip if they brought me 10 dishes ans checked on me each time to make sure they were to my liking

 

 

theyre providing the service of removing stress from eating, so why is it ok for them to make below minimum wage? 

 

as a waiter at one place i worked, i actually had paychecks where i made more money in taxed tips than i did hourly so i actuslly had to pay them (needless to say i left) but if it wasnt for my tips i woulsve made 0 dollars-30 

 

also sorry about the typos


The percentage of "15" seems to be the norm that is expected. Most places will print suggestions on the bill for you, normally 10, 15, and 20 percent, although sometimes I have seen 18. 

 

I agree with you as far as the cost correlated to the effort. The effort is likely the same no matter if my meal costs $20 or $200, but I guess if I am in the position to where I can afford a $200 meal, I can probably swing for the additional $40 tip. 

 

While rewarding bad service with a tip is contradictory, I also am aware that most of these waiters and waitresses in the establishments that I frequent probably aren't making but $2.13 an hour, so a tip goes a long way for them. Maybe they are having an off day, or maybe they were swamped and that's why my service suffered. Of course, maybe they are just slack and undeserving of said tip, but I tend to give them the benefit of the doubt. Besides, a lot of places have to split their tips, and it is unfair to punish the cook or bartender just because the waiter failed to deliver on their end.

 

I also tend to tip a little more if I am at a bar or restaurant watching a sporting event. I feel guilty for taking up space for so long knowing they could have served additional tables/earned additional tips in the time frame that I occupied the booth. The percentage of my tips also seem to increase with my levels of intoxication.

 

this is exactly my thoughts



#18 talbs

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:03 PM

Besides aren't companies legally required to pay the differences to make minimum wage?

 
Only if after tips, the worker fails to earn a minimum of $7.25 an hour.



#19 Frizzle

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:05 PM

So they're never out of pocket then?

#20 Rocket

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:05 PM

http://www.dol.gov/w...tate/tipped.htm

 

this is interesting



#21 talbs

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:10 PM

 

One of the "benefits" of being a waitress (in the short term especially) is that if you don't claim your tips as income like you're supposed to, when you file taxes at the end of the year, it appears that your income was next to nothing, so you receive it all back. All the while, you've been blowing through those untaxed earnings living like a big shot. The downside is, for those who make it a career at least, when old age comes around and it is time to receive those government benefits, your monthly check is next to nothing, because it appears as if you didn't really contribute much over your lifetime, because for taxation sake, you didn't.



#22 KyloRen

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:10 PM

I tip around 15% in general. I know the people make only  about $2.13 (in hourly wages), because the companies told the US government that the tips would make up the other $5 to meet minimum wage, and the government said that was fine, so most of the servers income comes from tips. If the service was very good, such as coming by a lot to check if everything was ok, noticing that my soda was empty and getting me a refill close to every time I finished my soda, I'll tip more. 

If the service was bad, I'd probably tip around 10%, as I usually tip 15% for regular service.

 

As for tipping more if I'm so concerned over them not making a lot of money, I'm a college student who doesn't have a job. Any income comes from my grandma who sends me $100 a month. Therefore, I don't have a ton of money to be able to tip more. 

 

 

I honestly would prefer that the US go the way of Japan. In Japan the tip is automatically added onto the bill, so you don't have to worry about it or calculate it yourself. Of course, some people will get all mad if they had bad service and weren't able to tip very low or even stiff a person because of it. There could be a reason why the service was bad. Maybe they have a ton of tables to deal with, maybe one table is being very needy and causing them a lot of trouble, who knows. 



#23 Rocket

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:12 PM

One of the "benefits" of being a waitress is that if you don't claim your tips as income like you're supposed to, when you file taxes at the end of the year, it appears that your income was next to nothing, so you receive it all back. All the while, you've been living off of untaxed earnings like a high roller. The downside is, for those who make it a career at least, when old age comes around and it is time to receive those government benefits, your monthly check is next to nothing, because it appears as if you didn't really contribute much over your lifetime, because for taxation sake, you didn't.

 

That really depends on where you work, I know some places include the tips on your paycheck so it gets taxed, while others pay you in cash and you can claim or not claim it yourself at year end.



#24 talbs

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:14 PM

That really depends on where you work, I know some places include the tips on your paycheck so it gets taxed, while others pay you in cash and you can claim or not claim it yourself at year end.

 

Yeah well if it were me personally, I wouldn't work somewhere that collected my tips, then allocated them at the end of the night, thus being able to monitor how much I was actually getting. I was of course speaking of places where the waitress come and clean the table, stick the bills in their pocket, and proceed on over to the next table.

 

I just know people who are obviously reporting the bare minimum $7.25 at 40 hours a week over a calendar year revealing earnings that look something like $215 per week or about 15k annually, whereas in reality it's closer to $500-$600 a week after tips, which is equivalent to someone making about 36k a year.



#25 Frizzle

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 01:43 PM

I honestly would prefer that the US go the way of Japan. In Japan the tip is automatically added onto the bill, so you don't have to worry about it or calculate it yourself.


Eh? You're thinking of gratuity which doesn't exist in Japan because there is literally no tipping culture (it's seen as rude and crass), except for in extremely rare circumstances (private tour guides mainly).


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