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#51 Coops

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 09:05 AM

For me, I find it hard to seem like a functioning human being and talk to people about my life.  I am expected to have a higher education, have a job, and have a healthy social life.  Though, I have shcizoaffective disorder and am most likely going to live my whole life working at best a minimum wage job and live off of disability.  I've been told that "that's a shit life".  Well, yah, pretty much, and I've accepted that.  I don't really like pretending I'm normal, I actually got myself out of a deep depression by accepting my mental illness and fighting with it rather than hating it and trying to fight it.  That's something that's hard with schizo problems is I'm aware of my delusions/paranoia/etc, so I know how to hide it, and I'm really good at it, too, so I seem normal on the surface.  I find myself in too many uncomfortable conversations.  I've found it so much better when I'm blunt and I'm just like "naw, I can't work or go to school, I am not mentally healthy enough."  

 

Apologies if this doesn't even fall under ableism.  It feels like it does so //shrug.

That does fall under ableism. @Jess nailed it basically. It really sucks people lack understanding and empathy for your mental illness. 



#52 greenhorn

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 02:44 PM

I was "misdiagnosed" with autism (by which I mean my guardian just decided that was what I had, and used it as an excuse to justify controlling my life) so that was fun. Basically the whole "autistics barely count as human beings" bullshit. I'm still trying to figure out how to function as a person much less an adult. 

 

It turns out I probably do have pretty severe ADD and possibly dyscalculia, but the fam (different from the ones above) doesn't believe ADD is a real thing or worse think you just have to "power through it". So they aren't actually interested in helping me get access to medication, even though it would probably help me hold down a job and take more classes at college. What's worse is that meds for ADD have some of the highest effectiveness for people that actually need it, but because of all the misunderstandings surrounding the disorder it's hard to get a diagnosis even if you have the means.

 

For those wondering why that's a big deal, ADD can cause significant impairment in emotional regulation, memory retention, and executive function - the ability to plan and then execute an action. So it can be a huge pain in the ass for getting anything at all done. 



#53 Kate

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 04:52 PM

I was "misdiagnosed" with autism (by which I mean my guardian just decided that was what I had, and used it as an excuse to justify controlling my life) so that was fun. Basically the whole "autistics barely count as human beings" bullshit. I'm still trying to figure out how to function as a person much less an adult. 

 

It turns out I probably do have pretty severe ADD and possibly dyscalculia, but the fam (different from the ones above) doesn't believe ADD is a real thing or worse think you just have to "power through it". So they aren't actually interested in helping me get access to medication, even though it would probably help me hold down a job and take more classes at college. What's worse is that meds for ADD have some of the highest effectiveness for people that actually need it, but because of all the misunderstandings surrounding the disorder it's hard to get a diagnosis even if you have the means.

 

For those wondering why that's a big deal, ADD can cause significant impairment in emotional regulation, memory retention, and executive function - the ability to plan and then execute an action. So it can be a huge pain in the ass for getting anything at all done. 

I have ADHD predominantly inattentive (also known as ADD) and if you ever want to chat about it, I'm available. 



#54 greenhorn

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 08:17 PM

I have ADHD predominantly inattentive (also known as ADD) and if you ever want to chat about it, I'm available. 

 

Thanks, I appreciate the offer! I'll definitely do so sometime.



#55 Kaddict

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 09:30 PM

I have ADHD predominantly inattentive (also known as ADD) and if you ever want to chat about it, I'm available. 

Same. It never bothered me until med school, since that was the time I needed to finally study and focus, but I can't take any stimulants...so I just have to deal with it still. For really important exams, I just had a couple study partners that would keep an eye on my computer to make sure I was focused and getting through material. 



#56 Kate

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 07:57 AM

Same. It never bothered me until med school, since that was the time I needed to finally study and focus, but I can't take any stimulants...so I just have to deal with it still. For really important exams, I just had a couple study partners that would keep an eye on my computer to make sure I was focused and getting through material. 

I went off medication when I was 18 and struggled for a long time before going back on medication a few months ago. I'm 26. I did learn a lot about how to manage it on my own as far as time management goes but in general I'm definitely better off medicated. The difference in my life since going back on it has been significant. It's definitely not for everyone though. I'm on a pretty low dosage of Concerta (18mg a day) and it's unbelievable how much it has helped me, I wish I had taken the plunge sooner. 



#57 Kaddict

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 10:10 AM

Ya, I wish I could. I have asked my cardiologist about trying a non-stimulant like strattera, but he says "I would just rather not risk it" so I am stuck off any of them. But it is ok, the majority of my studying days are behind me. And I did well enough on all my exams so I guess it's cool



#58 NulVote

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 07:39 PM

Ya, I wish I could. I have asked my cardiologist about trying a non-stimulant like strattera, but he says "I would just rather not risk it" so I am stuck off any of them. But it is ok, the majority of my studying days are behind me. And I did well enough on all my exams so I guess it's cool

What, you have a cardiologist and can't take stimulants.  That sounds serious. 



#59 Kate

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 12:48 PM

Ya, I wish I could. I have asked my cardiologist about trying a non-stimulant like strattera, but he says "I would just rather not risk it" so I am stuck off any of them. But it is ok, the majority of my studying days are behind me. And I did well enough on all my exams so I guess it's cool

A friend of mine has a heart condition (he has had multiple surgeries since he was born and just last month I had to go spend the night with him after he had his heart jumped twice), and he is also ADHD predominantly inattentive. He is on medication for it and thought it was Concerta but I'm pretty sure it's not. I know he had to discuss a lot of options with his doctors before going on anything but whatever he is on doesn't look like brand Concerta or even the generic that's available here. I'm rambling but my point is, there are options available depending on your heart condition. He's on beta blockers and has been for his entire life, he's been medicated for his ADHD on and off since he was 6.



#60 Kaddict

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 03:42 PM

Eh, I have gone into atrial fibrillation a few times. Had to be shocked once. It isn't a huge deal though. But, at this point, I have much less to gain from taking stimulant meds than I have to possibly lose from taking them. I take beta blockers as needed for the heart stuff (and while in the operating room for hand tremor, ha).



#61 greenhorn

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 04:09 PM

I went off medication when I was 18 and struggled for a long time before going back on medication a few months ago. I'm 26. I did learn a lot about how to manage it on my own as far as time management goes but in general I'm definitely better off medicated. The difference in my life since going back on it has been significant. It's definitely not for everyone though. I'm on a pretty low dosage of Concerta (18mg a day) and it's unbelievable how much it has helped me, I wish I had taken the plunge sooner. 

 

I was on Concerta for a week or two in middle school, but unfortunately my guardians decided it was too expensive/not effective even though I'm pretty sure it wasn't long enough to establish the latter.



#62 NulVote

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 05:36 PM

Eh, I have gone into atrial fibrillation a few times. Had to be shocked once. It isn't a huge deal though. But, at this point, I have much less to gain from taking stimulant meds than I have to possibly lose from taking them. I take beta blockers as needed for the heart stuff (and while in the operating room for hand tremor, ha).

"Father" T said that his ejection fraction had returned to 33% after going on entrestro.  He also says that has nothing what so ever to do with your condition.  I think that also means I am not getting my inheritance as quickly as I thought. He is on atenolol which can effect memory and such, so you know that its like the opposite ADHD drug.  He asks if you've experimented with different beta-blockers to see which cause less attention/memory shitstorms.   As his attorney, I must state  that while Father T has a medical degree and Ph.D. he is not a licensed physician and his musings should not be considered medical advice.


Edited by MissToad, 21 December 2017 - 05:39 PM.


#63 Kaddict

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 06:37 PM

"Father" T said that his ejection fraction had returned to 33% after going on entrestro.  He also says that has nothing what so ever to do with your condition.  I think that also means I am not getting my inheritance as quickly as I thought. He is on atenolol which can effect memory and such, so you know that its like the opposite ADHD drug.  He asks if you've experimented with different beta-blockers to see which cause less attention/memory shitstorms.   As his attorney, I must state  that while Father T has a medical degree and Ph.D. he is not a licensed physician and his musings should not be considered medical advice.

I have only tried propranolol. I haven't noticed any memory problems with it. Especially since I use it infrequently (just when I am doing lots of surgeries, so at this point is probably only gonna be 20-30 times per year). Also, he has a medical degree but isn't licensed? What does he do for work? Is he in research or pharm?




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