Quantcast

Jump to content


Photo

Veganism(/vegetarianism but mostly veganism)


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Cass

Cass
  • Stronteigenwijs

  • 1,560 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 January 2017 - 07:56 AM

Just looking for some experiences from vegans :) I'm slowly adopting a slightly more vegan lifestyle (note, I am not an actual vegan). Why? I moved in to a dorm with a vegan roommate, and since we eat together every now and again I've gotten into vegan meals. I wanted my cuisine to be more varied and accessible for my roommate as well. Turns out I love vegan dishes. Also, I've noticed I don't really miss meat all that much.

 

Then why not just vegetarian? Well, I've recently come to notice that I'm becoming lactose intolerance. Cutting dairy out of your diet doesn't equate all vegan, I know, and I can't guarantee I'll never eat an egg anymore in my life, but it makes for a good transition. In summary, I enjoy it, it makes me more conscious about my choices in the supermarket, I'm trying to opt for more environmental-beneficial stuff and healthy stuff, and I need to cut dairy.

 

So what are your experiences on veganism? Why did you choose to become vegan? Did you transition or went all-in immediately? What was the hardest part? What's your favourite dish? Any other remarkable experiences you'd like to share?

 

I hope there's vegans on this forum or else this topic'll be hella empty lol



#2 KyloRen

KyloRen
  • Snoke says I'm special.



  • 5,101 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 January 2017 - 11:10 AM

My old roommate was vegan. She seemed to like hummus and fruit quite a bit. I myself am vegetarian (well, partly. I eat certain types of fish, but when you say pescetarian no one knows what that is). I'm vegetarian because meat tastes awful to me, I just can't eat it. I guess I really never had a transition. 

I happen to like tofu and soy quite a lot, and those are allowed under veganism. I suppose the hardest part I have is that my campus dining hall does not offer very many choices for vegetarians/vegans. Most of the time I'm eating noodles, vegetables and some fruit. Plus, they tend to overcook the vegetables. Today we had snap peas, and they were just awful. Vegetables have to be cooked right for me to eat them. I perfer steamed or baked to fried. 



#3 Turnip

Turnip
  • woomy woomy manmenmi!!

  • 2,480 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 January 2017 - 04:36 PM

I never really had to transition either because I was raised as a vegetarian straight from day 1 >w<

 

If you're cooking up a dish that would normally contain meat, sometimes you can replace it with potatoes/tofu/sometimes beans, or meat substitutes if you like those/are available to you. I know about the whole thing where they can affect your hormones, but surely if you eat them every once in a while it won't be that bad for your body :p Anyway! It all depends on the dish but it's good to keep those alternates in mind. So when Elin and I make curries, to bulk it up (and also have more for me to eat) we'll include his chicken and some potatoes for both of us and I'll pick the chicken out for him. Speaking of curries, a load of those can be turned into vegetarian/vegan if they aren't already off the bat, so with Indian/Vietnamese/Chinese/Japanese/Thai/I can't even list all the different variations here you'll have plenty of selection ^^ I loooove my butter chicken curry and tikka masala, and Japanese curry too. But I've barely scratched the surface when it comes to that whole world of food so there's a whole bunch of discovering I still have to do!! Also, quinoa is fantastic as well and it's delicious. Loaded with fibre and protein!! I'm sure you'll be able to find some sold in bulk at a great price.

 

Eggs don't contain lactose and shouldn't really be considered dairy, so if you aren't going vegan because of the whole "absolutely nothing that comes from an animal" reason then I'd say keep eating those :0 Great source of protein and other important nutrients!!

 

I think the hardest part which is mostly just an inconvenience, is that when you're going to restaurants with friends (hell, even chain fast food places), you should definitely check their menu beforehand and see if they'll have anything you can eat there. It's mostly an issue with family owned joints but it's still an issue you can run into. Even today some places don't have any proper vegetarian/vegan options and you'll be stuck eating whatever appetizers instead of an actual meal. Like hell, a McDonalds near us decided to stop selling their vegetarian wraps. so outside of I don't know, asking them to make me a burger but hold the meat or getting an overpriced salad, there isn't really much of a selection for me at that specific location. At least a different one still has their Mediterranean wraps lmao



#4 KyloRen

KyloRen
  • Snoke says I'm special.



  • 5,101 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 January 2017 - 05:38 PM

I never really had to transition either because I was raised as a vegetarian straight from day 1 >w<

 

If you're cooking up a dish that would normally contain meat, sometimes you can replace it with potatoes/tofu/sometimes beans, or meat substitutes if you like those/are available to you. I know about the whole thing where they can affect your hormones, but surely if you eat them every once in a while it won't be that bad for your body :p Anyway! It all depends on the dish but it's good to keep those alternates in mind. So when Elin and I make curries, to bulk it up (and also have more for me to eat) we'll include his chicken and some potatoes for both of us and I'll pick the chicken out for him. Speaking of curries, a load of those can be turned into vegetarian/vegan if they aren't already off the bat, so with Indian/Vietnamese/Chinese/Japanese/Thai/I can't even list all the different variations here you'll have plenty of selection ^^ I loooove my butter chicken curry and tikka masala, and Japanese curry too. But I've barely scratched the surface when it comes to that whole world of food so there's a whole bunch of discovering I still have to do!! Also, quinoa is fantastic as well and it's delicious. Loaded with fibre and protein!! I'm sure you'll be able to find some sold in bulk at a great price.

 

Eggs don't contain lactose and shouldn't really be considered dairy, so if you aren't going vegan because of the whole "absolutely nothing that comes from an animal" reason then I'd say keep eating those :0 Great source of protein and other important nutrients!!

 

I think the hardest part which is mostly just an inconvenience, is that when you're going to restaurants with friends (hell, even chain fast food places), you should definitely check their menu beforehand and see if they'll have anything you can eat there. It's mostly an issue with family owned joints but it's still an issue you can run into. Even today some places don't have any proper vegetarian/vegan options and you'll be stuck eating whatever appetizers instead of an actual meal. Like hell, a McDonalds near us decided to stop selling their vegetarian wraps. so outside of I don't know, asking them to make me a burger but hold the meat or getting an overpriced salad, there isn't really much of a selection for me at that specific location. At least a different one still has their Mediterranean wraps lmao

I started avoiding McDonalds as soon as they messed up my cheeseburger without meat over 10 times. One time, all I got was two pickles, a bun and ketchup. I don't think that's a "cheeseburger without meat". 

As for eating out at restaurants, I've run into the same issue. My family and I went to a mexican place, and the only thing on the menu without any type of meat or shellfish (as I'm allergic, they had shrimp fajitas), was an appetizer cheese quesadilla. I don't think it was family owned, however. I've been to places on holidays that said they were going to serve their regular menu, but when we went, they had this little menu of a few choices. All I could eat was dessert, and you had to order an appetizer, entree, and desert under their odd policy for the holiday menu. We had to get them to make me plain noodles.  They said we could get the noodles as an entree, and two desserts to make up for the fact I couldn't get an appetizer. Instead we got charged for the noodles and the two desserts as separate items, instead of it all being under the price they listed for their "appetizer, entree, dessert" holiday thing. 



#5 Amethyst

Amethyst
  • I swallowed a rock


  • 2,715 posts


Users Awards

Posted 05 January 2017 - 07:12 PM

I'm neither but I prefer vegan food to a lot of regular ones. (Because I'm fucking weird.)

The best thing I can suggest to you? Morningstar farms. 

 

If someone didn't intervene I'd probably live off of their products alone.

 

The corn dogs, veggie burgers, and chicken nuggets are the absolute best. 



#6 Padme

Padme
  • 1,577 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 January 2017 - 12:35 AM

I've periodically been vegan and it's typically how i eat day-to-day naturally anyway.

 

Finding good substitutes for things is hardest.. I also was a raw vegan a couple times and that was expensive and time consuming to only eat raw things (so much prep work!)

 

I've been a vegetarian for around 14 years now and I am one for every single reason under the Sun. It started how due to animal cruelty and it's extended into an environmental thing for me also :) 



#7 Prisca

Prisca
  • Clouded Liberty


  • 2,383 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 January 2017 - 01:35 AM

i've been watching a ton of vegan and raw vegan channels on youtube, they are interesting and inspiring. I am not vegan or vegetarian, but i like that a lot of their food options are healthy. Niomi smart is my favorite health food inspiration. I bought her book and have been using it to make healthy changes to our family diet. I am very curious to hear how individuals transition from a standard american diet to a vegan/veg diet. I don't like greens (yuks) and love chicken, so it seems overwhelming for me to try to eliminate the yummies for the yuckies (because that's the battle in my mind lol). Anyways... i'll be casually stalking this thread. :)



#8 JinxProof

JinxProof
  • 140 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 January 2017 - 11:10 AM

I'm going to second @Amethyst on Morningstar farms. I'm not vegan but daaaang corn dogs are A+

 

Also, for fun, check out Vegan Blackmetal Chef on Youtube. Good recipes and hilarious!



#9 Ali

Ali
  • Wielder of the Spork

  • 3,201 posts


Users Awards

Posted 06 January 2017 - 11:54 AM

Life without cheese is my biggest fear.



#10 pancakeface

pancakeface
  • 768 posts


Users Awards

Posted 13 January 2017 - 07:18 PM

I go vegan sometimes as an exercise in will-power and non-greed.

 

From a nutritional standpoint: hummus, beans, sprouts, soy and its products (edamame, tofu, seitan, kitsune) make up the necessary protein replacement.

 

From a taste standpoint (which is argued to also be health-related, as savory flavors increase satiety and make overeating less likely) mushrooms, miso, celery and vegetable stocks. 

 

Shoutout to avocado and coconut for the stable fat replacement.



#11 Pink_Bubble

Pink_Bubble
  • 340 posts


Users Awards

Posted 14 January 2017 - 01:29 AM

I opt for a plant-based diet whenever possible, but I wouldn't consider myself vegetarian or vegan -- mostly just broke. A half-kilo of tofu here is $1.20, so it's just more economical as a student in the city.

So far this thread has been apolitical, so I'm sorry if my following analysis is unwelcome. I realize people arrive at veg-ism for their own reasons (nutritional benefits [skin, diabetes, weight], moral, ecological) but I do have ideological concerns with the political aims of the veg movement, most of which is detailed here: Dismantling White Veganism. Additionally, I'd like to add that the problems of factory farming are problems which are symptomatic of a profit-based economic system: the only reason we pack animals in cages isn't simply because of the moral depravity of the workers employed there or even capitalist who runs the factory-farm, but because it is profitable and advantageous to make the most out of that real estate as a result of this economic system.

The lack of a centrally planned economy and an existing anarchy of rule among the producers makes it impossible for there to be an agreement on the extreme reality of the crises (eg methane emissions), let alone a consensus to funnel much-needed resources into research for their solutions, or alternatives such as lab meats and other sources of agriculturally sustainable sources of protein.

As these problems are structural, imho overthrowing capitalism is the best way to resolve crises caused by the meat industry. The struggle for animal liberation and ecological restoration has to be hand-in-hand with revolutionary socialist politics, because individual consumer choices ("voting with your wallet") is not going to cut it. Indeed, the expectation for this approach and attitude puts the blame and responsibility on the masses of consumers, who are in relation, of more modest means than the handful of producers who maintain the industry.

It also reeks of social chauvinism and classism to expect consumers to bear the burden of animal liberation and ecologic restoration, as large sections of the population live in 'food deserts' (not within access of a supermarket) or are unable to afford the time (and depending on your location, the expenses) to commit to such a drastic lifestyle change, especially in the case of workers at their most intense shades, such as a single parent who works multiple jobs, attends school and has dependent children.

I would like to see a future without animal cruelty and suffering, and I'm thoroughly convinced that as long as there is a profit to be made from it, it will continue on a mass scale as it is today.


Edited by Pink_Bubble, 14 January 2017 - 01:34 AM.


#12 vika

vika
  • 13 posts

Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:15 PM

went from vegetarianism to veganism for ethical reasons and it's been 2yrs so far!!

i was a vegetarian for like 3 years first tho

 

the hardest part was that i loved pizza and dairy ice cream

but then i found vegan pizza + ice cream that i lvoed more

 

my fav vegan dish is probs the tikka masala from trader joes  :wub:  :wub:

 

it's still awkward at holidays but really i just eat a lot of spaghetti and bean burritos

 

anyway yeah totally support u!! n good luck



#13 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴



  • 9,194 posts


Users Awards

Posted 24 January 2017 - 01:15 PM

I was a vegetarian for a few years, like many high-school hippies were. The only advice I have is to keep a close eye on how you feel and adjust as necessary. Being vegetarian was the worst health I'd ever been in and I felt absolutely horrible. Now, I can pinpoint exactly where I fucked up and if I were to do it again, I'm confident I could do it properly and wouldn't feel as bad as I did, but I doubt I'll ever go back to full-blown vegetarianism. 



#14 Coops

Coops
  • 🌧️🌩️🌧️




  • 3,602 posts


Users Awards

Posted 25 January 2017 - 02:06 PM

I was a vegetarian for a few years, like many high-school hippies were. The only advice I have is to keep a close eye on how you feel and adjust as necessary. Being vegetarian was the worst health I'd ever been in and I felt absolutely horrible. Now, I can pinpoint exactly where I fucked up and if I were to do it again, I'm confident I could do it properly and wouldn't feel as bad as I did, but I doubt I'll ever go back to full-blown vegetarianism. 

This. Seriously.

My sister went vegetarian and then vegan for ethical reasons. She got fat, depressed and incredibly unhealthy because she was mostly consuming carbs and struggled to get enough fats/proteins. After three years, she finally went back to eating meat, and it didn't take long for her to feel healthy again. She felt so awful all the time. She went back to eating meat specifically because it made her so sick. That's not saying that will happen, just that it's super important to research it thoroughly, and pay attention to your body.

 

 

 

I opt for a plant-based diet whenever possible, but I wouldn't consider myself vegetarian or vegan -- mostly just broke. A half-kilo of tofu here is $1.20, so it's just more economical as a student in the city.

So far this thread has been apolitical, so I'm sorry if my following analysis is unwelcome. I realize people arrive at veg-ism for their own reasons (nutritional benefits [skin, diabetes, weight], moral, ecological) but I do have ideological concerns with the political aims of the veg movement, most of which is detailed here: Dismantling White Veganism. Additionally, I'd like to add that the problems of factory farming are problems which are symptomatic of a profit-based economic system: the only reason we pack animals in cages isn't simply because of the moral depravity of the workers employed there or even capitalist who runs the factory-farm, but because it is profitable and advantageous to make the most out of that real estate as a result of this economic system.

The lack of a centrally planned economy and an existing anarchy of rule among the producers makes it impossible for there to be an agreement on the extreme reality of the crises (eg methane emissions), let alone a consensus to funnel much-needed resources into research for their solutions, or alternatives such as lab meats and other sources of agriculturally sustainable sources of protein.

As these problems are structural, imho overthrowing capitalism is the best way to resolve crises caused by the meat industry. The struggle for animal liberation and ecological restoration has to be hand-in-hand with revolutionary socialist politics, because individual consumer choices ("voting with your wallet") is not going to cut it. Indeed, the expectation for this approach and attitude puts the blame and responsibility on the masses of consumers, who are in relation, of more modest means than the handful of producers who maintain the industry.

It also reeks of social chauvinism and classism to expect consumers to bear the burden of animal liberation and ecologic restoration, as large sections of the population live in 'food deserts' (not within access of a supermarket) or are unable to afford the time (and depending on your location, the expenses) to commit to such a drastic lifestyle change, especially in the case of workers at their most intense shades, such as a single parent who works multiple jobs, attends school and has dependent children.

I would like to see a future without animal cruelty and suffering, and I'm thoroughly convinced that as long as there is a profit to be made from it, it will continue on a mass scale as it is today.

 
I would +rep this a fuckload if I could.



#15 neobella18

neobella18
  • 10 posts

Posted 01 April 2017 - 10:46 PM

been vegan for 5 years.

didnt do it right at first.

 

some trial and error. i take a few supplements. things change over the years and have to alter your diet needs. 



#16 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴



  • 9,194 posts


Users Awards

Posted 02 April 2017 - 07:44 AM

How's it going for you @Cass

#17 Shiemi

Shiemi
  • 131 posts


Users Awards

Posted 02 April 2017 - 09:48 AM

Life without cheese is my biggest fear.

 

Lol. Actually it's funny you say that, because I tried vegan cheesecake for the first time yesterday, and I honestly couldn't tell the difference.

I don't know how the heck they do that



#18 neobella18

neobella18
  • 10 posts

Posted 02 April 2017 - 11:41 AM

the thing with vegan cheese is there is good ones and bad ones.

 

theres lots of vegan cheese sauce recipes that are easy and good. ive given it to non vegan friends too and they loved it.

 

i think people can go without anything you just have to try and actually care at least a little.



#19 Cass

Cass
  • Stronteigenwijs

  • 1,560 posts


Users Awards

Posted 03 April 2017 - 01:32 AM

How's it going for you @Cass

The transition didn't go as smooth as I'd hoped. The meat isn't that hard to get rid of, I only eat it when others have cooked for me. Dropping the eggs was easier than I initially thought. I've replaced plain milk and yoghurt with soya or coconut alternatives. But I have to confess I keep forgetting about the contents of fooditems. I keep consuming things that aren't clear-as-day dairy products (cream sauces f.e.) and then regret my life as the fires of hell burn in my stomach. Haven't been able to give up milk in my coffee yet. I'm a such a drag. I'm still weening myself off of cheese too; I only eat goat cheese instead of cow cheese. My stomach is a lot more thankful and I start to get used to the lack of dairy cheese.

 

All in all I think the conclusion we can take is that dairy is an addiction stronger than the cigs I smoke lmao.



#20 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴



  • 9,194 posts


Users Awards

Posted 03 April 2017 - 06:24 AM

The transition didn't go as smooth as I'd hoped. The meat isn't that hard to get rid of, I only eat it when others have cooked for me. Dropping the eggs was easier than I initially thought. I've replaced plain milk and yoghurt with soya or coconut alternatives. But I have to confess I keep forgetting about the contents of fooditems. I keep consuming things that aren't clear-as-day dairy products (cream sauces f.e.) and then regret my life as the fires of hell burn in my stomach. Haven't been able to give up milk in my coffee yet. I'm a such a drag. I'm still weening myself off of cheese too; I only eat goat cheese instead of cow cheese. My stomach is a lot more thankful and I start to get used to the lack of dairy cheese.
 
All in all I think the conclusion we can take is that dairy is an addiction stronger than the cigs I smoke lmao.

Yeah, definitely. I eat paleoish and dairy is the hardest thing for me too.

#21 Cass

Cass
  • Stronteigenwijs

  • 1,560 posts


Users Awards

Posted 01 May 2017 - 09:57 AM

Dropping by to share this vegan stuffed eggplant recipe that was brought into my life and has made my tastebuds dance with joy:

 

  • Cook up a can of chickpeas
  • Slice your eggplant(s) in half
  • Scrape out the meat, save the 'shell' for later
  • Chop the scraped out eggplant meat up together with some garlic cloves and onions
  • Oil up a saucepan, throw in the meat-garlic-onion deliciousness
  • Throw in some garam masala (i.e. spice blend consisting of cinnamon, pepper, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, bay leaves & cumin)
  • strain the chickpeas, throw m in a bowl and mash them up with a fork
  • take a banana (I KNOW JUST TRUST ME OKAY) and mash it in with the chickpeas. If you're not too heavy on the sweets take half a banana.
  • take your chickpeas-banana blend and throw it in the saucepan along with the eggplant/onions/garlic mush
  • Pour in a bit of rice milk and blend everything together
  • Stuff your eggplants with the mixture
  • Throw some cayenne pepper spices on top of that for fanciness and spiciness
  • Throw that shit in the oven
  • Gloriously eat that

You're welcome



#22 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴



  • 9,194 posts


Users Awards

Posted 01 May 2017 - 10:38 AM

Dropping by to share this vegan stuffed eggplant recipe that was brought into my life and has made my tastebuds dance with joy:

  • Cook up a can of chickpeas
  • Slice your eggplant(s) in half
  • Scrape out the meat, save the 'shell' for later
  • Chop the scraped out eggplant meat up together with some garlic cloves and onions
  • Oil up a saucepan, throw in the meat-garlic-onion deliciousness
  • Throw in some garam masala (i.e. spice blend consisting of cinnamon, pepper, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, bay leaves & cumin)
  • strain the chickpeas, throw m in a bowl and mash them up with a fork
  • take a banana (I KNOW JUST TRUST ME OKAY) and mash it in with the chickpeas. If you're not too heavy on the sweets take half a banana.
  • take your chickpeas-banana blend and throw it in the saucepan along with the eggplant/onions/garlic mush
  • Pour in a bit of rice milk and blend everything together
  • Stuff your eggplants with the mixture
  • Throw some cayenne pepper spices on top of that for fanciness and spiciness
  • Throw that shit in the oven
  • Gloriously eat that
You're welcome

make sure you're saving that chickpea liquid for other stuff

#23 Coops

Coops
  • 🌧️🌩️🌧️




  • 3,602 posts


Users Awards

Posted 01 May 2017 - 12:00 PM

make sure you're saving that chickpea liquid for other stuff

What do you use for chickpea liquid for?



#24 Jess

Jess
  • 🍴Aioli-American🍴



  • 9,194 posts


Users Awards

Posted 01 May 2017 - 12:09 PM

What do you use for chickpea liquid for?

Google aquafaba

You can use it for all kinds of stuff, mousse, egg replacer, whipped cream. It's pretty neat

#25 limbust

limbust
  • 10 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:00 PM

Overall i just don't like the sound of dead animals, once you see a cow's eyes it's hard to think those will be in your plate next time you eat a steak. I can eat meat and I do enjoy certain types of meat, which is why i don't consider myself vegetarian, though i do want to eventually transition into full vegan.

Good luck!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users