Quantcast

Jump to content


Photo

Windows 7


  • Please log in to reply
90 replies to this topic

#76 MasterJunpei

MasterJunpei
  • 453 posts

Posted 15 February 2010 - 04:44 AM

I have always had compatibility with WindowsBlinds. Its a bullshit, fail program.


oh thats one other thing i don't like about 7 is the damn compatability assisant, I disabled everything that had to do with it, to try to force compatability, but no. Even with it turned off it ressurects itself to be a bitch to say NO!.

#77 kbbbb

kbbbb
  • 329 posts

Posted 15 February 2010 - 07:07 AM

The sad thing is that millions of users will never ever notice these improvements, because they will just click next while the computer does everything for them.

This is the way things SHOULD work- without problems. Today, there may not be universal praise for the thing, but people will come to appreciate it later on when comparing it with other things. It will also make businesses run more smoothly and have IT Help Desks dealing with REAL problems (like how stupid most people are) and not bugs.

I have yet to try Windows 7, but i'll presume that there are teams of crims out there working on Vundo for Windows 7 and will hit hard when they work it out. OS protection was easier when there weren't f***wits out there trying to scam money out of people abusing security holes. The scammers have financial incentive to push as far and as wide as possible, which arguably makes them more dangerous.

Good to know it's a step up from Vista.

#78 iargue

iargue
  • 10,048 posts


Users Awards

Posted 15 February 2010 - 08:19 AM

This is the way things SHOULD work- without problems. Today, there may not be universal praise for the thing, but people will come to appreciate it later on when comparing it with other things. It will also make businesses run more smoothly and have IT Help Desks dealing with REAL problems (like how stupid most people are) and not bugs.

I have yet to try Windows 7, but i'll presume that there are teams of crims out there working on Vundo for Windows 7 and will hit hard when they work it out. OS protection was easier when there weren't f***wits out there trying to scam money out of people abusing security holes. The scammers have financial incentive to push as far and as wide as possible, which arguably makes them more dangerous.

Good to know it's a step up from Vista.



The vast majority of virus's and malware out there, do not exploit security holes in a computer. They rely on the retardation of users to install the virus.

#79 kbbbb

kbbbb
  • 329 posts

Posted 15 February 2010 - 06:01 PM

The vast majority of virus's and malware out there, do not exploit security holes in a computer. They rely on the retardation of users to install the virus.


Vast majority, yes. But Vundo appears to spread using the more insideous methods. Its usual method of transmission is via downloaders. The downloaders having infected the users' computer using javascript and iFrames, installing on the users' machine by viewing a website.

Only serious amounts of education/limiting internet surfing to corporate sites/Firefox with Scriptblocker can protect people from malware exploiting those holes.

#80 iargue

iargue
  • 10,048 posts


Users Awards

Posted 15 February 2010 - 06:26 PM

Vast majority, yes. But Vundo appears to spread using the more insideous methods. Its usual method of transmission is via downloaders. The downloaders having infected the users' computer using javascript and iFrames, installing on the users' machine by viewing a website.

Only serious amounts of education/limiting internet surfing to corporate sites/Firefox with Scriptblocker can protect people from malware exploiting those holes.



No. Your not at risk from things downloading themselves automatically via Iframes/Javascript. Even if they could download, they cant run.

#81 kbbbb

kbbbb
  • 329 posts

Posted 18 February 2010 - 07:53 PM

No. Your not at risk from things downloading themselves automatically via Iframes/Javascript. Even if they could download, they cant run.


Whose not at risk of programs running once downloaded and/or downloaded maliciously?

Windows 7 users? I know Vista had some pretty tight controls on allowing or disallowing programs to run.

#82 Kway

Kway
  • Proud to be a Brony

  • 1,198 posts


Users Awards

Posted 18 February 2010 - 08:09 PM

Whose not at risk of programs running once downloaded and/or downloaded maliciously?

Windows 7 users? I know Vista had some pretty tight controls on allowing or disallowing programs to run.


Windows 7 is just as tight. The only way a program can run is if the user executes it or the system has a script to execute it (only possible by running a program to insert the code or done by the user). Everything leads down to user error.

#83 iargue

iargue
  • 10,048 posts


Users Awards

Posted 18 February 2010 - 08:26 PM

Whose not at risk of programs running once downloaded and/or downloaded maliciously?

Windows 7 users? I know Vista had some pretty tight controls on allowing or disallowing programs to run.



Windows 7 removed the UAC bypass for drivers and Antivirus programs to use. Now, every program that run needs Admin privaleges. This provides 100% security from all virus's that runs from download.

#84 kbbbb

kbbbb
  • 329 posts

Posted 18 February 2010 - 10:23 PM

Windows 7 removed the UAC bypass for drivers and Antivirus programs to use. Now, every program that run needs Admin privaleges. This provides 100% security from all virus's that runs from download.

In the short term. I'm sure malware writers will find a way to bypass such security and get their programs running on the infected system. They always do. There's big gangs making lots of money out of it.

#85 Fatal

Fatal
  • 3,615 posts


Users Awards

Posted 20 February 2010 - 05:11 PM

UAC is worthless IMO. I recommend everyone to completely disable it.

#86 iargue

iargue
  • 10,048 posts


Users Awards

Posted 21 February 2010 - 01:11 AM

In the short term. I'm sure malware writers will find a way to bypass such security and get their programs running on the infected system. They always do. There's big gangs making lots of money out of it.



No.

The skill of malware writers has deteriorated to a laughable point. I see hundreds of them that dont even write their own .exe blocking script, they rely on the registry to do it.


These people rely completely on the retarded tendency of its users. And they makes thousands.

#87 kbbbb

kbbbb
  • 329 posts

Posted 23 February 2010 - 10:19 AM

No.

The skill of malware writers has deteriorated to a laughable point. I see hundreds of them that dont even write their own .exe blocking script, they rely on the registry to do it.


These people rely completely on the retarded tendency of its users. And they makes thousands.


http://www.theregist...download_peril/

Adobe security hole- and a victim's relative

http://www.sevenforu...cution-bug.html

Clicking "yes" on update, when a very legitimate looking prompt appears on the screen asking to update, is not a retarded response.

#88 iargue

iargue
  • 10,048 posts


Users Awards

Posted 23 February 2010 - 10:28 AM

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/02/18/adobe_download_peril/

Adobe security hole- and a victim's relative

http://www.sevenforu...cution-bug.html

Clicking "yes" on update, when a very legitimate looking prompt appears on the screen asking to update, is not a retarded response.



1)Not a windows exploit. This exploits third party installed on a computer. Windows cant protect you from that.
2)A hacker did not do this. That would be too much work, this is discovered by a white hat.
3)If the user displays any form of intelligence, they will say no, for two reasons. 1)You dont do updates that popup while your browsing the web, unless you click the link on the Adobe Flash webpage. 2)If its not broken, dont fix it.


Its easy to tell that its bullshit, given that whenever you use the Adobe Download Manage (Which your not even forced to use, you can download and install it on your own) you have to be on the Adobe.com website, and click Install Flash, or Install Adobe (At which point Internet Explorer will make sure you want to do this). So, if your not on the Adobe.com website clicking to download the program...You should close it.

#89 Metigue

Metigue
  • 689 posts

Posted 24 February 2010 - 06:43 AM

The reason malware and virus programming seems to be in the decline, is probably due to the lack of security exploits in what users are running these days, I remember with flash 7 and a little bit of action script, you could make a harmless flash animation open / create, write to a file in the background, save it, and run it, all without prompting. This little exploit was very soon fixed.

Back on topic: Windows 7 rules.

Edited by Metigue, 24 February 2010 - 06:43 AM.


#90 kbbbb

kbbbb
  • 329 posts

Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:21 AM

1)Not a windows exploit. This exploits third party installed on a computer. Windows cant protect you from that.
2)A hacker did not do this. That would be too much work, this is discovered by a white hat.
3)If the user displays any form of intelligence, they will say no, for two reasons. 1)You dont do updates that popup while your browsing the web, unless you click the link on the Adobe Flash webpage. 2)If its not broken, dont fix it.


Its easy to tell that its bullshit, given that whenever you use the Adobe Download Manage (Which your not even forced to use, you can download and install it on your own) you have to be on the Adobe.com website, and click Install Flash, or Install Adobe (At which point Internet Explorer will make sure you want to do this). So, if your not on the Adobe.com website clicking to download the program...You should close it.

Yeah it's easy for those who understand the internet and computers generally, and of course the programmers. But many people aren't as savvy, and will press buttons to make something go away. This includes screens that say something about updating a program that they recognise. This is not and should not be regarded as an attack on their intelligence; but it does mean that they are lazy. They can't be bothered learning about computers, it's a bad use of their time. But I have virus protection, they say. To say people are 'stupid' for falling for this one is oversimplifying the issue. It's easy to tell a person what they should and should not do, but Microsoft have attempted to go the step further and protect the lazy- and in this circumstance they've failed, because a rogue program has managed to get into someone's machine.

Windows 7 has run an ad campaign saying that it's safe to do banking on (for the lazy). Regardless of how it gets infected, this proves that Windows 7 is penetrable and not 100% safe.

#91 iargue

iargue
  • 10,048 posts


Users Awards

Posted 24 February 2010 - 12:29 PM

Yeah it's easy for those who understand the internet and computers generally, and of course the programmers. But many people aren't as savvy, and will press buttons to make something go away. This includes screens that say something about updating a program that they recognise. This is not and should not be regarded as an attack on their intelligence; but it does mean that they are lazy. They can't be bothered learning about computers, it's a bad use of their time. But I have virus protection, they say. To say people are 'stupid' for falling for this one is oversimplifying the issue. It's easy to tell a person what they should and should not do, but Microsoft have attempted to go the step further and protect the lazy- and in this circumstance they've failed, because a rogue program has managed to get into someone's machine.

Windows 7 has run an ad campaign saying that it's safe to do banking on (for the lazy). Regardless of how it gets infected, this proves that Windows 7 is penetrable and not 100% safe.



Microsoft cant stand next to you every second. What they did, was prompt you asking, Are you SURE???? And the person said yes. What the hell else can they do? UAC still activates on the Adobe Download Manager...

What UAC does, is it prevent EVERYTHING from running without permission. Nothing, and I mean nothing, can install without you first giving the okay.

All that you have shown me is an exploit that prompts a user to install something... and the user says yes. Windows 7 was not exploited in any way, and thus, it is safe to do banking on.

This exploit doesnt target anyone but the stupid. The number 1 rule in the entire world is that if you didnt start it, dont say Yes.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users